Monthly Archives: May 2016

Glowstache With Amp Dashboard

Ridesharing service Lyft will ring in the new year with a new type of taxi light.

Come 2017, the company is shaving off its pink Glowstache, replacing it with a less hairy in-car connected device — Amp.

“With the introduction of Amp comes the retirement of Lyft’s beloved pink mustache, which has evolved from the fuzzy Carstache on car grilles, to the sleek Glowstache dashboard ornament,” Ethan Eyler, Lyft’s head of ride experience, said in a statement.

“Both paved the way for Amp, which will sit on dashboards, illuminating the streets with an iconic glow while better connecting drivers and passengers,” he added.

Starting Dec. 31, the in-car connected device will make drivers’ and passengers’ ride-sharing experience “smarter, safer and more fun.”

Rolling out first to folks in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Las Vegas and New York City, Amp is expected to hit the road in all of Lyft’s 200-plus markets by mid-2017.

The Beats Pill speaker-shaped accessory attaches to the vehicle’s dashboard, making it visible through the windshield; commuters can identify their ride by matching an individual Amp’s color to that displayed in their mobile app.

Messages, meanwhile, are pushed through a Bluetooth connection to the hidden screen on the back of the gadget.

Lyft also revealed its latest brand campaign: Ride on the Bright Side. Four 30-second TV spots (video above) and outdoor advertising are set to run through the end of 2016, highlighting the company’s experience, driver quality and safety.

That safety-first attitude is underscored by a recent partnership with Budweiser: Through Dec. 31, any passenger 21 years or older can get a free ride (valued up to $10) from Lyft on weekends and holidays.

The Uber competitor, however, landed in hot water early this month when researchers uncovered a “pattern of racial discrimination by drivers” using the ridesharing apps.

Most Admired Tech Found

What are the traits you respect most in a leader?

Whether it’s a composed demeanor, an understanding of human nature, integrity or a laser-focus on setting and achieving goals, there are many effective ways to lead and inspire trust and confidence.

Last month, CB Insights, a firm that analyzes tech trends, launched a March Madness-style bracket and asked people to vote for the tech founders and executives they admired most, describing it as “Wrestlemania for tech geeks.”

The results of the final vote came in, and Tesla and SpaceX CEO and co-founder Elon Musk is the victor.

He beat out runner up the late Apple Co-founder Steve Jobs, as well as a group of 62 big names such as Microsoft’s Bill Gates, Netflix’s Reed Hastings, beauty guru Michelle Phan, Zappos founder Tony Hsieh and Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer.

It seems that while Jobs’s tenure at Apple changed the way we think about the technology we carry around with us, almost as an extension of ourselves, people were apparently more inspired by the man who wants to colonize Mars.

In July of 2016, there were 930,000 daily active users (DAU) with paid accounts on the Slack network, and three million registered users worldwide. Approximately 77 percent of Fortune 500 companies use the program for data sharing and mobile collaboration, according to data provided by DMR Stats and Gadgets.

Users refer to themselves as “Slackers,” and that is part of the popularity and unique culture of the app, which carries the slogan “Be less busy.” The app was repurposed from a failed game design, and received a 64.5 percent approval rating on the 2016 Applause Mobile Sentiment Analysis.